Kittanning Citizens Bridge

Kittanning is a small town of just under 4,000 residents on the Allegheny River northeast of Pittsburgh. The name is from a Native American village destroyed in 1756 and is thought to mean “the place at the Great River.” It has a single bridge, the Kittanning Citizens Bridge, which was built in 1932 and renovated in 2010. According to historicbridges.org, “In a rare gesture of good faith to taxpayers and preservationists, PennDOT has made the logical decision to rehabilitate this bridge rather than demolish and replace it.” So while this bridge was an unplanned stop on my weekend wanderings and in my blog schedule, it fits nicely with the current theme of demolish & replace or renovate.

The northeastern shore (the Kittanning side) has a nice waterfront park with a boat launch, amphitheater, upper and lower walking paths, fishing and seating areas, and seasonal public restrooms. The southeastern shore (the West Kittanning side) has some houses set back across a road looking out toward the river.

3 thoughts on “Kittanning Citizens Bridge

  1. who goes through life like a turtle? (see plaque and offer interpredation?)

    “Turtle Creed” to carry in their wallet. The creed states: Turtles are bright eyed, bushy tailed, fearless and unafraid folk with a fighter pilot attitude. They think clean, have fun a lot, and recognize the fact that you never get anyplace worthwhile in life unless you stick your neck out.

  2. I have learned a little bit more about Kittanning and a little bit more about turtles: (1) Kittanning was a big deal in the french and indian war and I don’t remember learning about the french and indian war, and (2) seeing a turtle hatch in Topsail North Carolina is completely different than sticking your neck out. And the old Kittanning bridge as a long time in generating funds and was stuck with tornado within a year (?!?) of completion? And e-r-t-y on every computer keyboard center-top is homage to Daugerty of Kittanning who placed those last four letters of his last name where they are.

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